Temporary Guardianship

Some state statutes provide for temporary or limited guardianships. These guardianships are generally granted by the courts to achieve a specific purpose for a certain amount of time. Once the purpose is accomplished, the guardianship is terminated.

Also, emergency guardianships have been granted. In these situations, an emergency situation exists and someone is needed to give approval in order for the person to receive emergency services. A temporary guardian is appointed by the court to serve during the existence of the emergency situation. Generally, the person being served by the temporary guardian is disabled or incapacitated in some way. The court must determine that the person being served by the guardian is unable to make the emergency decision because of mental disability, addiction, debilitating disease, or some other similar limitation. The court must also determine that if a guardian is not appointed, the person is at risk of serious harm or even death. Finally, the court must determine that there is no other person available who can make the emergency determination for the incapacitated person.

The order for emergency guardianship is generally granted for a short period of time which is sufficient to allow the situation to be handled properly. After the emergency situation has ended or subsided, the temporary guardian must file a report with the court detailing the nature of the services rendered by the guardian and describing the outcome of the situation.


Inside Temporary Guardianship